Tuesday Sep 30, 2014 Stars feature in IRB's Recognise and Remove Concussion Education Video

Stars feature in IRB's Recognise and Remove Concussion Education Video
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The IRB have launched a new concussion education drive, led by the video below, featuring stars of the game. The goal is to educate players, coaches and parents around the world to Recognise and Remove when it comes to knocks to the head.

In recent years, particularly since the George Smith incident on the Lions tour of Australia, concussion management has become a real concern, and an area that has demanded attention.

This video is hoped to be central to a game-wide education programme aimed at informing those involved in the sport about the symptoms and dangers of concussion on the rugby field.

Delivering the Recognise and Remove message are Wales’ Dr Jamie Roberts, England’s Women’s Rugby World Cup winner Maggie Alphonsi, Australia Sevens star Emilee Cherry, All Black Keven Mealamu and Italy captain Sergio Parisse.

Education sits at the top of the IRB and its Unions commitment to changing culture when it comes to taking concussion seriously at all levels of the Game.

The video will feature alongside player, coach and medic education at IRB tournaments and supplements education programmes delivered by individual Unions on an on-going basis.

Research-based advances in on-field assessment of head injuries and graduated return to play protocols are benefiting the elite game, while at community level promotion of correct playing techniques and longer rest periods for youths is also supporting players.

All of this is underpinned by research and guidance by a panel of field-leading independent experts.

An enhanced concussion education website featuring public guidance and key information on the Recognise and Remove programme in English, Spanish, Italian, Japanese and Portuguese has also been launched. Learn more at www.irbplayerwelfare.com

5 Comments

  •  drg
    drg

    I see a big problem there though... there isn't much going on inside the coconut of players wearing 1-3 (dare I include my own brethren 4-5 too..) so that helmet would be throwing up all sorts of errors...

    Reply
  •  10stonenumber10
    10stonenumber10

    He nutted Moody, speared BOD, and a good scrap with Cannon, other than that his record is fairly clean for a hooker. His reputation as one of the hardest front rowers precedes him, it carries a bit more weight when he tells you to go off the field instead of acting the hero

    Reply
  •  10stonenumber10
    10stonenumber10

    I think that is the deciding factor. Between amateur and professional, these lads are paid to play. If they take a proper knock, there are procedures in place by trained professionals to protect them, something an amateur ref and 2 subs for touch judges might not know. How many of us amateurs have taken a whack on a Sunday, and still feel it at work on Monday? You didn't go off because your team only brought 3 subs, and you can't remember the 2nd half despite playing all 80 minutes... chances are you'll forget about it by Thursday, and be back on the field the next weekend still fragile. Drinking doesn't help either. I know it is more of a Grassroots past time nowadays, but still, i've heard "Here, get this down ya, it'll sort your head" far too many times. Nothing in rugby hits as hard as the floor does. It won't be long before a surgeon somewhere invents a concussion checking helmet... an open face motorbike helmet with the necessary electrodes and radio scanning devices to assess the brain's functionality/damage in under 30 seconds, sort of like a portable MRI scan for brain injury. Big Pharma, i'm willing to let the patent go for a minimum 7 figure sum. No more flashing lights or asking questions, stick it on, scan the noggin, take it off, red or green light depending on whether they are injured or not!

    Reply
  •  drg
    drg

    Not sure rugby would be without the big hits... I mean it's fantastic to see the little guys, or even big guys run elusively, but every now and again when someone gets smashed it's just, 'oh so wonderful'... and realistically, you cannot suggest that not cheering/saluting the big hits will make much of a difference to the game. I found Rugbydump about 8 years ago? (maybe more or less, I can't recall) through the TSRB videos and as with above, although I appreciate watching the videos of great running, great handling and all round great play, I still am itching for the next of the series (Rugbydump?). Ranger has put it well.. it is extremely difficult to come off the pitch. As a second row/back row, in some games at the end, my legs could be cramping every scrum, my speed is down to 60%, my brain is mentally fatigued, I know that a sub could come on and be 'better', but do I want to come off? Hell no... Then there is the times when you get a knock early on, you feel that if you come off your team will be weaker and you don't want to let them down... Rugby is far beyond the physical game, mental games are where professional teams can edge 'physically better' teams. How the rules will change to avoid big hits is something I am both intrigued and terrified to see.. I don't quite know how they can police what are now legal but huge hits, especially if they are below neck height and actually involve completely wrapping the arms so there is no question of 'attempting' or not...

    Reply
  • It would also help if we, the viewers, didn't 'salute' the big hits. Besides, that way of playing is all so old school now. Why bother running in to a hit if you can, er, run round the 20 stone guy coming at you? That is, avoid the collision before it takes place. Once the brain damage lawsuits start up here, as they are in the states with the NFL, wait and see how the rules will suddenly change to make this dangerous play. Their days are numbered....

    Reply

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Stars feature in IRB's Recognise and Remove Concussion Education Video | RugbyDump