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Tuesday Nov 28, 2017

UPDATE: Sekope Kepu banned for that shoulder charge on Hamish Watson

UPDATE: Sekope Kepu banned for that shoulder charge on Hamish Watson
9
Comments

Wallabies tight head prop Sekope Kepu appeared in front of an independant World Rugby-appointed Disciplinary Committee today, following the red card he received for charging with his shoulder during Australia’s 53-24 loss to Scotland on Saturday.

Kepu, sent from the field by referee Pascal Gauzère in the 39th minute, was charged with infringing law 10.4(h): ‘a player must not charge into a ruck or maul. Charging includes any contact made without use of the arms, or without grasping a player’.

The 31-year-old accepted that he had committed the act of foul play and that a red card was just.

The Disciplinary Committee, chaired by Jean-Noel Couraud (France), along with former international players, Becky Essex (England) and De Wet Barry (South Africa), considered all of the available evidence and heard submissions from Mr Kepu and his representatives.

The Disciplinary Committee considered the relevant incident to have been a dangerous shoulder charge into a ruck in which contact was made with an opponent’s head.

In considering sanction, the Disciplinary Committee assessed the seriousness of Mr Kepu’s conduct and concluded that it had been in the mid-range of World Rugby’s scale of seriousness for that type of offending, which has an entry point sanction of a six-week suspension.
 
The Disciplinary Committee considered that there were no aggravating factors and that there were several mitigating factors, including Mr Kepu’s ‘guilty’ plea and his previous clean disciplinary record. They allowed the maximum discount of 50% and reduced the length of the suspension to three weeks.
 
Taking account of Mr Kepu’s playing schedule (and in particular that the Southern Hemisphere close season is about to start), the Disciplinary Committee suspended Mr Kepu until midnight on Sunday, 4 March 2018.

View the full incident below

9 Comments

  •  dancarter
    dancarter

    Hi, thanks, I hadn't heard of that before. Which law are you referring to? I couldn't find anything about it in the sections on rucks and tackles.

    Reply
  •  tommo19898
    tommo19898

    You could also ping him for not coming through the gate. However, materiality is key in scenarios like this. Based on the events in play, is Moore doing anything that will stop the blue player having an effect on the next phase? Probably not. If anything Moore and the other gold player are taking themselves out of their guard positions to protect Genia's pass...

    Reply
  •  tommo19898
    tommo19898

    You could also ping him for not coming through the gate. However, materiality is key in scenarios like this. Based on the events in play, is Moore doing anything that will stop the blue player having an effect on the next phase? Probably not. If anything Moore and the other gold player are taking themselves out of their guard positions to protect Genia's pass...

    Reply
  •  mattyp
    mattyp

    The laws of the game define "near" as within 1 metre.

    Reply
  •  dancarter
    dancarter

    The laws are quite vague, and just state (16.3F) "a player rucking must do so near the ball", which of course is open to interpretation, and it doesn't say anything about the legality of clearing out opposition players who are near the ruck but haven't actually joined it.

    Reply
  •  drg
    drg

    Interesting point actually, as a forward I was taught a few rucking techniques, one being if there was enough support behind me, then go into and beyond the opposition player, therefore allowing the players behind to successfully secure the ball or seal (seal the right spelling here? :/) I never really considered how far I could continue to make contact... But you're right that if I'm continuing on 5 metres etc then it's obviously some sort of obstruction..

    Reply
  •  larry
    larry

    Here's another question I have as a referee: how far ahead of the ball can a player on offense keep knocking back a defensive player in a ruck? Five meters ahead with the ball already out is obviously obstruction. Check gold #2 and ask yourself if he's too far ahead of play to be taking out an opponent?

    Reply
  •  larry
    larry

    Just an addendum, the shoulder charge isn't typical, but the taking out of one defensive player on the other side of the ball is very typical in rucks. All the other defenders are spreading out to mark opposition.

    Reply
  •  larry
    larry

    That would have been a great block in American football. Rugby? No wrapping of arms, illegal contact. But this type of play is typical now in that most forwards aren't going to go into rucks when the ball goes to ground, on either side of the ball. And with the recent law changes that there needs not be any contact with opposition to form a ruck, the game is just another step closer to being league, not union. Now we already have multiple phase pick and go rugby as it is, which to me is very boring. So, let's have a five phase maximum!

    Reply

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UPDATE: Sekope Kepu banned for that shoulder charge on Hamish Watson | RugbyDump - Rugby News & Videos