Sunday Jul 19, 2015 Wallabies snatch dramatic victory after Springboks fail to run down the clock

Wallabies snatch dramatic victory after Springboks fail to run down the clock
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The Wallabies came from behind to win in Brisbane after the Springboks had tried to run the clock down with a lead and thirty seconds remaining. A penalty followed before Tevita Kuridrani scraped the turf to score a famous winning try and claim a 24-20 victory.

The visitors had led the game and looked comfortable and on track for a win around 60 minutes, but injuries and poor replacement management contributed to their demise at the hands of a determined Wallaby outfit, who claimed the Nelson Mandela Challenge Plate.

The Springboks had the game in control following well taken tries by debutant Jessie Kriel and lock Eben Etzebeth, and after leading 20-10 with ten minutes left, a Michael Hooper try gave the Wallabies hope. At 20-17 with little time left and in control of possession, the Boks failed to run down the clock.

A penalty prompted a kick to the corner, before powerful centre Kuridrani scraped the ball on the tryline, despite the best efforts of Schalk Burger, who had a solid game at eighthman.

“We’re often reminded that we’re sixth in the world and South Africa was number two, so for us to get away with the win. I’m really proud of that,” said Wallaby coach Michael Cheika.

Springbok coach Heyneke Meyer spoke of the pain of losing at the death again in Australia, but said they will take valuable lessons from what went wrong in Brisbane.

“It’s heart-breaking to lose like that for a second year running in Australia, but we simply can’t dwell on it and have to take some harsh but valuable lessons to heart. Losing our captain early was tough and we finished the match with eight players who were playing in their 10th Test or fewer than that. It’s not an excuse – we will all be better for it and we will have to look at ways to overcome this.

“We probably lacked some experience at the end when we needed to close the match, but we’ve said from the word go this season that we wanted to use our five matches in the build-up to the Rugby World Cup to get ready,” explained Meyer.

Former Springbok and Italy coach Nick Mallett, now a pundit with Superport in South Africa, warned of the dangers of running down the clock late in the game.

“You have to be very careful to play out the clock by using your forwards in little pods off the loose scrums because northern hemisphere refs don’t like it and they look to the side with the ball and their players for sealing off the ball, and that’s exactly what happened,” Mallett said. 

“Schalk did his absolute best to get his hand under the ball, but there is a milli-second there where the ball touches the line. I think the TMO and the referee handled it as well as they possibly could. It was very difficult to see initially whether or not he got it down, but just the point of the ball goes down and just touches the ground.”

Updated video: Below is a match recap, and Wallabies injuries update.

19 Comments

  •  eddie-g
    eddie-g

    The choice of centre is really not easy... I assume you meant to include Frans Steyn in that group, Jacque Fourie is also in the frame, and JP Pietersen, who is sure to be in the WC squad, is seen as able to cover 13. Fitness permitting, JDV and Serfontein will be in, who joins them is anyone's guess right now.

    Reply
  •  eddie-g
    eddie-g

    I don't know the specifics, but he's been playing on the wing and not at 9 for a while now, in part because he was told he wasn't regarded as a viable 9 for the Boks. It's also to do with WC squad composition I think, Fourie du Preez is first choice scrumhalf, and Ruan Pienaar the back-up, and they might not take another in the 31-man group. So Hougaard has tried to get in as a wing, and so far, no luck. Should add it did come as a shock that he was dropped from the Bok training squad from which the WC squad will be chosen. But that's where we are.

    Reply
  •  stroudos
    stroudos

    Why's he no longer considered for scrumhalf??

    Reply
  •  kadova
    kadova

    Agree with you on this one. The referee cannot blow the whistle each and every time there's an infringement, because there would be no game at all. And that makes them look inconsistent. Sometimes the ref are actually inconsistent, sometimes not. And we will always scrutinize the refereeing when both teams are close.

    Reply
  •  kadova
    kadova

    Exactly. Owens warned them before acting, he could have penalised them immediately.

    Reply
  •  docrugby
    docrugby

    I think rugby is possibly the only game in the world where a referee not so much as coaches players but certainly directs them/tells them what to do and not do for that matter.Leave it 7,roll away 6 etc... There are so many possible infringements for a ref to rule on...can be such a huge influence on the outcome of two even teams. Having said that,it's rugby i love. Aside from that, The Wallabies surely won't be fooled by grabbing that one at the death, that they have much work to do.

    Reply
  •  eddie-g
    eddie-g

    Serfontein is injured at the moment - he's sure to be in the WC squad though - Hougaard has been dropped. About the latter, I'm a bit disappointed, I think he's one of the best guys to bring on from the bench. But now he no longer covers scrumhalf, the thinking is we don't need another wing (especially a small wing, we've got a lot of those). Anyway, I like him very much as a player, but I can also see how there isn't space for him in the WC squad.

    Reply
  •  vladimir
    vladimir

    Does anybody know what happened to Serfontein and Hougaard (as a winger)?

    Reply
  •  drg
    drg

    Agreed, but if referees are willing to throw in a warning to all teams due to an opposition infringement then I would be able to accept if the next penalty was against us for the same infringement (if it was a blanket warning). What I don't like to see is blatant failures to stay on feet let go without any kind of explanation..

    Reply
  •  eddie-g
    eddie-g

    A very experienced Wallaby team, at home, pipped a very inexperienced Bok team with the final move of the match. Frustrating, but in a World Cup year, by no means a disaster. And we learned some stuff. If anyone had told me we'd need some experienced heads to close out a tight, quality game, this is not news. If you'd told me that De Allende and Kriel have the makings of a world-class midfield, I would have needed convincing. Big credit to Meyer for pulling that combination out the blue.

    Reply
  •  bloblabli
    bloblabli

    man did you hear Owen screaming at them the previous ruck "keep up on your feet please"? he could have easily penalise them the 2 previous ruck. He warned them then penalised.... they can't complain!

    Reply
  •  bloblabli
    bloblabli

    i don't agree with you, when you are trying to play in a positive way the ref will always overlook small penalties (otherwise he would blow his whistle at every damn breakdown) but when you are trying to kill the game then he will pay more attention to your clean-out. At that level the players know that kind of stuff and therefore should be able to adapt. to my opinion it's a lack of lucidity from the player. (i know it's easy to say that from my living room all i'm trying to say is that Owen was right to blow that penalty.)

    Reply
  •  colombes
    colombes

    The last penalty shoud not surprised the boks staff if they had followed Nigel Owens way to ref this season >> Racing VS Sarries Correct or not, he never fears this kind of decision. The problem is these decisions appear often inconsistent

    Reply
  •  45678
    45678

    I've not watched the whole game, but 60 minutes in wonder if the inclusion of giteau is a little pointless for the aussies? the only reason why is because the standard backline move involved a miss pass from cooper to kuridrani. what's the pint of putting in such a creative talent if his sole purpose is to make tackles and attempt to look interested?

    Reply
  •  guy
    guy

    I agree with you on the need for consistency. Nevertheless the fact that it didn't get penalised last play, does not make it less illegal. It just makes you and your team lucky on that occasion.

    Reply
  •  vladimir
    vladimir

    I guess Springboks do not watch NH games: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YDXNVAbUfPY

    Reply
  •  finedisregard
    finedisregard

    You guys are right. There are bodies all over the ground at every breakdown with players not supporting their weight. Penalties are arbitrarily awarded. It's a big problem.

    Reply
  •  drg
    drg

    I agree with you regarding referees needing to be consistent. I find it infuriating that players can run into a ruck and throw themselves into someone and over the ball will get let off one minute and pinged the next... I'm all for throwing in a warning and penalising the next, but it seems to work in swings and roundabouts... sometimes penalised, next time not, on, off, off, off, on, on, on... wrecks my head!

    Reply
  •  sangdue
    sangdue

    Lovely game, but Owens handed the Wallabies the opportunity while "finding" a silly penalty. There are numerous of ceiling of/player leaving there feet in todays game. All I'm saying is the ref needs to be consistent, and start "giving" those penalties also. :)

    Reply

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Wallabies snatch dramatic victory after Springboks fail to run down the clock | RugbyDump