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Thursday Jul 9, 2015

Ruck Clean Out Drill trains players how to dominate the breakdown

Ruck Clean Out Drill trains players how to dominate the breakdown
6
Comments

Ruck Clean Out Drill

RUGBY DRILL: Ruck Clean Out – training your players to make snap decisions on how to eliminate threats at the breakdown reduces balls lost to turnovers, ensures quick ball, AND increases likelihood of penalties against the jackal for going off his feet.For more drills like this, check out our Coaches Pre-Season 2015 Sale here: http://coaching.rugbydump.com/coaches_preseason_july2015-v2Coaches – what do you think? Would you/do you use this drill at your sessions?

Posted by Rugbydump.com on Thursday, July 9, 2015

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As the above video on the Ruck Clean Out shows, training your players to make snap decisions on how to eliminate threats at the breakdown reduces balls lost to turnovers, ensures quick ball, AND increases the likelihood of penalties, against the jackal, for going off his feet.

For more drills like this, check out our Coaches Pre-Season 2015 Sale

 

Coaches – what do you think? Would you/do you use this drill at your sessions?

6 Comments

  • drg
    8:42 PM 12/07/2015

    Sorry Larry, in my state of fatigue I didn't really read your comment well and took it as something along the lines of "the video shows you illegal play" or something like that..

    Reply
  • larry
    6:30 PM 12/07/2015

    Perhaps I should clarify something: If a player closing over the ball, picks it up before coming in contact with an opposing player, then there has been no ruck formed. Believe me, I've seen, as a referee and spectator, players literally freeze in that situation, not knowing whether to pick up the ball or not. I've had to yell out "play the ball" or "no ruck, play the ball" when that situation has occurred. It seems to happen right after a ruck has ended, and another tackle occurs not very far upfield, just a few meters, and defenders retreating back aren't sure (if they are fairly new to the game) what to do regarding a ball just lying there on the ground, not sure if it's open play or not.

    Reply
  • larry
    6:15 PM 12/07/2015

    No. That's hands in the ruck, and should be penalized as such. Law 16 states that a ruck is "A phase of play in which one or more players from each team in physical contact (bound on to each other), on their feet, close around the ball on the ground. Open play has ended." "Players are rucking when they are in a ruck and using their feet to win or keep possession of the ball, without being guilty of foul play." So, looking at the first few minutes of the video, that's a tackle, not a ruck! The next player coming on to the ball on his or her feet, who isn't in contact with an opposing player, is free to pick up the ball and run with it. If contact is made with another player from the other side, it's a ruck. NO picking up the ball. It has to be played with the feet. Now, I know that different referees, perhaps in different nations or halves of the Hemispheres, might have a different interpretation of the laws. And that is a problem in rugby, isn't it? It's happening in baseball in the major leagues in America right now, with different umpires having their own interpretation of the strike zone, even though in the rule book it specifically states what is a ball or a strike.

    Reply
  • drg
    9:22 AM 12/07/2015

    I'm too lazy to: a) watch the video again b) check up on the laws But isn't the first person in allowed to have hands on the ball even after a ruck is formed... as long as they are on their feet and had their hands on the ball before a ruck was formed then it is fine...

    Reply
  • larry
    9:31 PM 11/07/2015

    I would have to say that the beginning of the video has more to do with a tackle rather than a ruck. It is what would happen after that tackle that would decide if a ruck has been formed or not. The tackled player must release the ball, as he's in the tackle and on the ground. If a team mate comes into the area and binds on to an opponent coming in from his side of the tackle, from behind the tackle for each player, there's a ruck, and the ball no longer can be handled off the ground, as it would have to be rucked back by one or the other player's foot. If that tackled player's team mate isn't bound on by anyone from the opposing side, he's free to pick up the ball and carry on. The same if the tackler's team mate arrives at the tackle, isn't bound on by anyone on original ball carrier's team; he'd be free to pick up the ball and carry on. No ruck would have been formed in either case, as it's free play.

    Reply
  • drg
    5:02 PM 10/07/2015

    Not a coach but I'd definitely try and introduce it and would hope it would be accepted.

    Reply


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Ruck Clean Out Drill trains players how to dominate the breakdown | RugbyDump - Rugby News & Videos