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Friday Mar 25, 2016

Graphic: The Most Popular Rugby Boots in the 2016 Six Nations

Graphic: The Most Popular Rugby Boots in the 2016 Six Nations
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Comments

Following a research study conducted by rugby marketing consultancy Muddy Rhino, we now know that the most popular model of rugby boot worn in the 2016 Six Nations is the adidas Predator Incurza. The below graphic demonstates the most popular boots in each position.

This year adidas represented 55 percent of all boots worn at the Six Nations 2016. Compared to Muddy Rhino’s 2015 research, adidas’ domination is down by two percentage points. Asics appear to be the biggest winners of the challenger brands in 2016.

As the brand that markets themselves as ‘relentlessly leading rugby’, adidas are widely accepted as being streets ahead of the chasing pack. At Rugby World Cup 2015 competitor brands targeted minnow teams to reduce adidas’ representation to 39 percent of all rugby boots worn.

Similarly, in the early rounds of the 2016 Six Nation competition adidas’ representation peaked at 57 percent. As the tournament progressed, and the wider squad players getting involved, challenger brands clearly targeted some of the fringe players. That saw adidas’ share drop as low as 50 percent.

In the short-term adidas has little to worry about with a glut of ‘the most recognisable’ names in rugby union being signed as official adidas athletes.

Remarkably, rugby centric brand Canterbury only had one player represented through Scottish-born Italian rugby player George Biagi. Heritage rugby brand Gilbert had only two players represented, namely Wales’ Jake Ball and Ireland’s Sean Cronin.

The 2016 tournament saw New Balance enter the rugby market with representation from Welsh wing Alex Cuthbert and Irish Centre Fergus McFadden. Meanwhile, Taulupe Faletau switched from Under Armour to adidas in round 2 to mark a major coup for the brand.

Nike’s representation saw them continue their stance as somewhat of a bit-player in rugby. They did introduce a striking ‘Crimson’ colourway for their Tiempo Legend 6 boots. Initially this model was worn by Sergio Parisse and Maxime Médard; then later among others including Grand Slam winners Danny Care, Owen Farrell and Jonathan Joseph.

adidas’ continued success appears to come from their cohesive strategy to range position-specific boots and the launch of the new Electric Pack 2 (yellow) colourway in the weeks prior to the tournament.

Although, black rugby boots made up 40 percent of the colours worn at Six Nations 2016.

The current adidas line-up dominated almost all positions. Their line-up includes Kakari aimed at tight five forwards, FF80 suited for back-row players, Crazyquick Malice for outside backs and the legendary Predator Incurza for goal kickers.

However, as illustrated in the above infographic, players continue to select boots from across the range regardless of playing position.

Looking towards next season it will be interesting to see how the pack of challenger brands respond. Nike have already unveiled their Anti-Clog Traction technology to prevent studs being clogged-up by the hallowed turf. Innovations such as these hold the potential to disrupt the landscape in 2017.

Need further data from this research exercise? Get In Touch with Muddy Rhino

17 Comments

  • 10stonenumber10
    1:09 AM 01/04/2016

    There has been controversy about blades since their development... Some newspaper scare stories about 30+ stitches due to a bad tackle... they never released info on rounded studs, after all, how many football careers have been ended by a wayward challenge or stamp from an old skool set of 6? Plastic studs caused superficial lacerations, risk for infection etc. Very soon after most manufacturers reverted to a softer rubber compound, one unable to be sharpened to an edge by the concrete floors in the changing room. I remember seeing a friend play in american football boots, where the stud has a female thread and posts sticking out of the sole instead... fearsome propositions. There are still lacerations now, but predominantly through footballers getting kicked trying to head the ball, or 2-footed tackle by a defender... you never lead with the foot in rugby, so it is less of an issue.

    Reply
  • drg
    9:29 PM 31/03/2016

    Ah, I see what you mean 10st10. Having not played on any artificial pitch before I can't comment exactly, but as with the above, I find unfamiliar footwear, or an unfamiliar type (such as the time I wore blades) to be quite distracting. Although saying that, it may be more of a mind thing, as when it comes to pre season and I break out the trainers, I don't often seem to think much about whats on my feet - other than what Stroudos stated, which is when someone else is wearing boots and they step on your toes, you know about it far quicker wearing trainers, than when wearing boots. Stroudos, regarding blades, I too have heard that "rumour" (?) regarding blades and lacerations - whether this is true or not, I don't know, perhaps there is a type of bladed shoe that can be worn in other sports but NOT rugby?? During the odd stud check before a game, I've not found referees to give much of a hoot about blades. Saying that, I think I recall a game where the referee said "no blades" and made one of our blokes change them... but this was one of those rotund 50 yr old referees who is only agreeing to do the job because of a free pint and pie...

    Reply
  • 10stonenumber10
    6:04 AM 30/03/2016

    Artificial pitches cannot withstand the forces put on them by screw in studs and "soft ground" blades/mixed sole plates, it is also dangerous for the player as longer studs grip much more firmly than on grass. The lack of slip contributes to lower limb injuries from innocuous twisting motions, so much so that one manufacturer has released a boot with a rotating stud under the ball to reduce shearing forces on ligaments further up the chain It is advised that all participants wear soft rubber moulded studs (like Copa Mundial), or shorter firm ground blades.... in a game of tiny percentages, is a change into unfamiliar footwear likely to have an effect on performance?

    Reply
  • drg
    9:12 PM 29/03/2016

    "The final point I have to put to this discussion... the majority of players nowadays wear screw in studs or blades, these cannot be used on artificial turf, can any forwards out there comment on whether it gives home teams advantage in the scrums and tight play?" What do you mean with that? I don't play on artificial turf, however I have found studs in scrums work far better for me than blades. I have only worn blades once when borrowing a pair of boots and although grip was ok when running and changing direction - or stepping... but for heavy work and also pushing off balls of feet, I've always found studs work better for me....

    Reply
  • jimmy23
    2:58 PM 29/03/2016

    SHAMELESS SELF PROMOTION TIME! Why not see all these boots in action in this 6 Nations Highlights video I made! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LrQJVR5GUaQ Unfortunately, because the people at RBS 6 Nations are a bunch of miserable c%nts I got pinged for copyright. So you'll only be able to watch it if you're in the UK, Italy or Ireland.... Although you could always try a proxy. Cheers! Sorry for spamming.

    Reply
  • 10stonenumber10
    5:40 PM 28/03/2016

    Jumping ont he Canterbury bandwagon... it's odd. Really odd. Everything else they do is damn near perfect, they are more or less the go-to brand for base layers, shorts, tracksuits etc., but I too have had bad experiences with their boots (though this was over 10 years ago). They were the last pair with screw in studs that I ever wore... it was like stepping on lego, that was the same season I got Osgood Schlatters and Severs Syndrome. A few years later I tried their Vapour copies (white with red heel) and dislocated my 2nd toe doing Lunges in the warm up. Cheap boots are a false economy, they are like car tyres... you might save a few quid, but they are the only thing connecting you to the floor, and 1,000,000 other things rely on them to function correctly too.

    Reply
  • drg
    10:36 AM 28/03/2016

    When you say luck, is that like +5% in luck attribute, or -20% in the build and quality attributes? As I said above, Canterbury boots were probably the worst boots I've ever had in my whole life - wrecked my feet, but being younger I never really thought about complaining.

    Reply
  • finedisregard
    11:47 PM 27/03/2016

    Wear any color boots you like: as long as they're black! I've had good luck with Puma, and Mizuno. Okay luck with Adidas. Bad luck with Nike and Canterbury. Anybody remember Lazer boots?

    Reply
  • larry
    3:41 PM 27/03/2016

    I've stayed away from screw in studs myself. Having played and lived in the San Francisco area the vast majority of the time since I first played in a rugby match, in January of 1973, I remember just about everyone then wearing American football shoes, usually Wilson or Rawlings, which were somewhat heavy, in that they had a thick sole of wood or some composite material, and they had the toe "cleat" as we call them here in America. I never bothered to change the studs while I used them in high school prior and then in college, where I did finally discover rugby. By my senior year, and because it didn't rain much that winter, I'd switched to rubber molded shoes, which were referred to as "soccer shoes." I lost that pair and replaced them with Adidas Juniors, wore those for a number of years, and then finally got a pair of Copa Mundials, which I wore whether a firm pitch or muddy for years and years, playing or reffing. I did have a pair of Mitre with the screw-in studs for really rainy-muddy conditions. In the last two years I've been wearing Adidas "turf" Copa Mundials, which have about fifty or more little rubber studs on the bottom, and they have even worked well with the rain and slick pitches we've had much of this season. I found them on E-Bay last year, and they are more comfortable to wear than the Copa Mundials. The last time I wore them was on October 3, 2015, when the touring California Bald Eagles, a vet side, played a combined vet side of Tewksbury-Bredon. I was going to wear the "turf" shoes, but a team-mate suggested the ground was just soft enough that they weren't going to give enough traction, so I decided to wear the Copa Mundials instead. I think they're the best shoe I've ever worn, and as I said, even worked well over the years whether a dry or soggy pitch, at least for me, as a fullback, wing, or referee, but not as a front-row forward or a lock or 8 man. Lastly, I can't stand these pink, lime green, or whatever shoes: Black please!

    Reply
  • drg
    11:54 AM 27/03/2016

    Totally agree, footwear is definitely more complicated than the footwear of old. Lighter footwear, stronger etc. I normally go for studs because of the added grip in our wonderful climate, helps for scrums, mauls etc...

    Reply
  • 10stonenumber10
    7:16 PM 26/03/2016

    Horses for courses... I gave up on screw in studs in 2005, before then blades on cheap boots used to be hollow dense plastic instead of solid rubber, a bit of wear and they turned razor sharp, and the shape caused pressure points in the foot causing metatarsal and toe knuckle stress fractures. That is why i liked the V1.06s so much, essentially carbon fibre espadrilles, no pressure points, no rigid structure, just studs strapped to your feet letting you get as close to a barefoot feeling as possible. I tried Nike Vapours, but the soleplate is waaay to stiff, if you're under 80kg they don't flex enough and cause all sorts of mid-arch strains. Footwear: Serious Business.

    Reply
  • drg
    10:05 AM 26/03/2016

    As long as they're good quality, only took me one game to destroy a pair of canterbury boots, lost a stud (as in the thread inside got destroyed) and tore part of the boot. If I'd been older I'd have taken them back to complain, they were the worst boots I've ever had. I even had the housing for another stud come through and into the foot area of the boot mid game. I think by the end of two games (and the training sessions between) the laces had pulled through some of the leather, I'd lost about 3 studs in each boot (where the threads got demolished) and had one housing poking through, definitely a -50% on foot health! In fact, my easter weekend is now somewhat ruined having remembered that!

    Reply
  • 10stonenumber10
    11:46 PM 25/03/2016

    They do them in most solid colours, don't forget the +5% Teamwork stats for matching them to the rest of your kit. Plain white is a solid failsafe, it only takes one game for them to get scuffed and battle scarred, surely that has to earn some cred without resorting to looking like a footballer?

    Reply
  • drg
    9:50 PM 25/03/2016

    Hmmm, I think I need something that isn't all black though... I'm fairly elusive when I'm on form, but speed and acceleration could do with a boost, I hear yellow boots give you +15 in attack speed - even though you get -5 in credibility (as a forward)...

    Reply
  • spencah
    8:48 PM 25/03/2016

    Coppa mundials any day - World Cup

    Reply
  • 10stonenumber10
    8:27 PM 25/03/2016

    There hasn't been a quality boot made since the Puma V1.06 waaaaaay back in 2006. Won an U19 7s cup and scored my first try in men's 7s wearing a pair of those. They bit the dust in a fireball when chavs stole my Merc in 2012 after 5 years of stellar service (thanks to plenty of superglue) Only way to go these days is Pantofola D'Oro (Golden Slippers). Design hasn't changed since 1886, and they come in all black.

    Reply
  • drg
    7:43 PM 25/03/2016

    Well it's understandable that locks and props need adipower boots, got yourself a lethal tighthead, crazy quick flankers and a bunch of predators... Question is, which boots do I need in order to improve my rating and street cred?

    Reply


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Graphic: The Most Popular Rugby Boots in the 2016 Six Nations | RugbyDump - Rugby News & Videos