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Wednesday Mar 15, 2017

Referee Angus Gardner dissects controversial mid-air contest rulings

Referee Angus Gardner dissects controversial mid-air contest rulings
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An interpretation of the game that has long been discussed and debated, challenges in the air regularly cause controversy based on what does and does not constitute dangerous play. Australian referee Angus Gardner joined Fox Sports in an attempt to shed light on how officials police these incidents.

We’ve all reacted to refereeing decisions with confusion, disagreement and even frustration at some point during a rugby match.

While not always clear cut, Gardner explains similar in-the-air challenges on a case-by-case basis to give an idea of how he comes to a decision on whether to play on, give a penalty or show a yellow card.

It’s a fascinating look into the mind of a referee and reassuring that Gardner acknowledges that in most cases, there is a lack of intent from the offending players.

He looks to identify good contests while trying to clamp down on reckless play in the best way possible.

The examples of getting it right, and wrong, are definitely worth seeing, as is the consistency of the ruling. So whether you are watching Super Rugby or 6 Nations action this coming weekend, keep an eye on how the refs approach these sort of incidents.

credit: tightfiverugbyunion

21 Comments

  • vladimir
    9:00 AM 18/03/2017

    If they really enforced the 'jump into tackle', there would be no ambiguity about these situations. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8q78YPBDv78

    Reply
  • drg
    11:30 PM 17/03/2017

    Part 2..... That being said, Goode was totally convinced he was going to get the ball to, I don't believe he was jumping to ruin Paynes day, I think he was trying to go for the ball. In my eyes... it was an accident. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JgNPQZEBisM Another giant "bullshit" decision!

    Reply
  • drg
    11:26 PM 17/03/2017

    That is my absolute go to for how bullshit the law is, it makes my blood boil to see that, Payne's arms were out, he was 100% going to catch that ball in his eyes, all of a sudden Goode leaps and clatters them both!

    Reply
  • im1
    5:03 PM 17/03/2017

    this is a better example https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujVD0A2mbYo

    Reply
  • drg
    3:30 PM 17/03/2017

    Probably right, but Biggar is a knob, so I enjoyed the clip..

    Reply
  • jimmy23
    8:21 AM 17/03/2017

    I'm not sure that's the best example to bring up. Hogg didn't so much as charge down as deliberately shoulder charge Biggar in the face very late. He jumps after Biggar kicks and doesn't even attempt to raise his hands. Was a red all day long. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ImYlu7THs9o On a side note, I didn't realise ref's could change the colour of the card after it's given?

    Reply
  • finedisregard
    5:52 AM 17/03/2017

    Facepalm, Do you sit around with your teammates and say "there ought to be a new law.." or "Gosh I wish rugby was more safe"? I've never heard players speak that way on 7 clubs, 3 continents and 22 years.

    Reply
  • finedisregard
    5:50 AM 17/03/2017

    Money is destroying rugby. Everything that is special about rugby culture comes from the amateur ethos (the way we treat each other, the referee, the way the fans act). I currently live in America and I know the outcome of the trend of big money in sport. My worst nightmare is coming true, rugby is getting more and more like American football. Look at the Racing Stade Francais merger. Mega clubs manned by international mercenaries ala Champions League is the way of the future. We've sold our soul to lure the money of casual fans. Such a shame too, rugby union has such magnificent tradition and culture.

    Reply
  • drg
    11:42 PM 16/03/2017

    The concerning thing for me Guy is the examples we see in other sports where commercialism is the driving force.... NFL, Soccer etc these are two examples where the players are greater in their own minds than the game, not all, but many. Why? Because money makes them so great... Rugby has a lot of development which is due to money, however I believe the problems will increase exponentially as long as money is the driving force over love of the game...

    Reply
  • drg
    10:16 PM 16/03/2017

    So Stuart Hogg a few years ago jumps at a charge down with Bigger (very moronic) and hits Biggest supposedly hard... ...So why isn't there a duty of care for the player on the ground? Isn't this the same as jumping into a tackle, or anything like that, eyes on the ball and someone jumps into you, how is that your fault? Exactly the same as a dummy runner getting taken out, you throw yourself at the opposition, don't get upset if it doesn't always go your way!

    Reply
  • drg
    10:13 PM 16/03/2017

    This is precisely my argument, take the jumper out of the game and trajectory shows the ball landing straight into Daly's arms... I know that's very easy to say, but I don't care for this duty of care to the jumper thing, I believe that only counts when a player tackles a player in the air, when you see eyes fixed on the ball as an arse hits the bloke in the face I'd say it becomes the rather unfair to blame the bloke in the ground...

    Reply
  • drg
    10:09 PM 16/03/2017

    When I said "the players" I meant the players in the video.... Not "the players of the world"... However, now you brought it up, I actually believe these players are probably a pretty fair representation of the players of the world...Why?... Because frankly, no one really has a bloody clue who's who in moonbat zoo when it comes down to these decisions.... In the recent Sanchez video, if I was the bent nose player, I'd be pissed at Sanchez but also feel extremely lucky I caught the ball, because I wouldn't be able to help feeling that if I'd dropped the ball is be off with a red...

    Reply
  • im1
    8:03 PM 16/03/2017

    This is rubbish. That guys a referee? This isn't a patch on the way refs who invited BT rugby tonight explain the laws and the thought processes going through their heads. The most this guy does is mention competing for the ball and hips above shoulders. Just pointless

    Reply
  • vladimir
    7:42 PM 16/03/2017

    Money can convince people to do silly and dangerous things. NFL went through concussions scandals and younsters are still eager to join big franchises.

    Reply
  • guy
    3:12 PM 16/03/2017

    I do believe that commercial interest play a big part in the development of the game during the last decade. To keep a steady amount of cash flowing first of all you need to keep the game attractive to the spectator. Now I know that a lot of hardcore rugby afficionado's are not big fans of some of the new laws and interpretations. But it might just be that those changes do land well with the average rugby spectator. Second thing is that, if you want the sport and the profits to be sustainable in the future, you need to keep building the sport (and therefor the spectator base) from grassroot level up. Now I am a parent. Generally speaking I don't think many parents would choose a sport with a high risk of serious injury (be it anything ranging from concussion to a broken neck) for their kids. So it is in the interest of the sport in the long future to make decisions in the interest of player welfare at top level. Quite a few people seem to be convinced that the risk of a serious injury while contesting the ball in the air, is quite small. That might just be so for professional players. I guess the risks at grassroot level might be a lot higher.

    Reply
  • jimmy23
    2:23 PM 16/03/2017

    How do people feel when the defender jumps at the very last moment? For example, Elliot Daly's red card against Argentina. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nwFJ_pBzIyg&t=58s On one hand, I felt bad for Daly here. If you watch the video, you can see that Senatore didn't jump until Daly was about 2 feet away from him. Unless if he's a Shaolin Monk, I'm not sure how Daly is supposed to react quickly enough to stop in time and prevent that from happening. If the chaser can't realistically react in time to the catcher's actions then should it be interpreted as the catcher putting themselves in a dangerous position? I seem to remember the fight that resulted in Moody's red card came from Cueto being taken in the air by Alesana Tuilagi. However it was from a cross field kick in the middle of the pitch and Tuilagi had started his challenge BEFORE Cueto jumped for the ball. How was Tuilagi supposed to anticipate that? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0l91f28J_Ng On the other hand you could say that Daly should have anticipated Senatore jumping and taken that into account in his chase, therefore the red was justified. In which case all chasers should just assume that regardless of the circumstances, whoever is claiming a high ball will jump and should either prepare to hit them when they land or be prepared to jump themselves.

    Reply
  • facepalm
    1:36 PM 16/03/2017

    A bit unfair to say there's a disconnect of opinions between players and rugby authorities based on an interview with two of the many thousands of professional players out there. And even if there is, it doesn't make World Rugby wrong. The current rate of knockouts can't continue. Realistically, the game isn't being drastically altered either. Let's not get carried away.

    Reply
  • facepalm
    1:25 PM 16/03/2017

    I'm struggling to see what's so ambiguous about World Rugby's directives surrounding the high ball. Players have to have a duty of care to those in the air. Hoiles' opinion is so moronically dangerous.

    Reply
  • drg
    11:55 AM 16/03/2017

    I guess FD, it's where the money is coming from, sponsors and unions... I don't know, maybe my comment was a little ignorant, maybe players are ignorant and should be treated as such. If I think running headfirst into a tree trunk repeatedly is good fun, shouldn't someone who oversees the event from his arm chair maybe step in and say, "that's a little dangerous mate...." It's really catch 22... Consider the last 60 years of rugby (not that I am able to comment that far back) but rugby was played by men with jobs, they went out had a laugh, gave a bit of biff smoked some cigarettes, drank some beer then went home fans loved it, they wanted their team to win and rivalry's intensified on the field, players want to be the next best thing, so they push themselves, then as time goes on, some silly bastard or club decides HE can make money from the sport, all he needs to do is convince some good players to quit their day job, spend all day training and they'll win tournaments and the like - therefore he gets a cut/or his club which is probably got his business as a sponsor... This continues over the years to what we had 10 years ago, which is full time gym junkies running at each other breaking heads/legs and everything else, but who cares? They're probably insured right? They get paid well, until we start seeing the worst parts of repeated concussions shine through.. ...Now we have an issue, I wonder if we'll soon start seeing the lads of the early pro era, suffering from more and more issues.... Problem with this is (forget human life of the player, it's worthless now he's retired) it's the image of the sport and how much that costs the unions and sponsors involved... Do you want your company name to be splashed about on a shirt that a bloke who's dribbling and can't remember his own name is wearing? So of course safety gets blasted in and us as players, amateurs and pros alike get caught up in the middle of it...

    Reply
  • finedisregard
    11:25 AM 16/03/2017

    The great thing about rugby is that for most of our history it was a sport by and for the players, even at the highest level. Now it seems there is a disconnect between what players want and what the "powers that be" want the game to be. I'm not sure where and why all these top down changes are coming from. They are drastically altering the sport. Who is in charge of the game: players, referees, owners, sponsors?

    Reply
  • drg
    10:02 AM 16/03/2017

    Basically the players are stating that they probably disagree with ANY of those incidents being card worthy.... I think this protection shit for the jumper is really ruining the sport...

    Reply


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Referee Angus Gardner dissects controversial mid-air contest rulings | RugbyDump - Rugby News & Videos